Book Review: The Meaning Of It All: Thoughts Of A Citizen-Scientist, By Richard Feynman

This book is a transcript of three lectures given by Feynman in 1963 at the University of Washington.

“The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen-Scientist, by Richard Feynman” is another book (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0201360802/) by the revered physicist Richard Feynman, who passed away in 1988. This book is a transcript of three lectures given by Feynman in 1963 at the University of Washington. What makes the book unique (at least in the context of Feynman’s other books) is the subject matter. Here Feynman discusses, among other things, statistics, religion, and politics. But from the perspective of a scientist. Can the scientific method – or more generally, logical thinking – shed light on nonscientific areas of inquiry? Feynman tackles this question head-on with a unique insight that is classic Feynman: witty, self-aware, concise. His observations on the illogic of the English language and the nature of politics will be of interest to lawyers, but the entire book is thought-provoking. I have incorporated numerous quotes from this book into my serious of semi-random e-mail signature files. So I’ll be promoting this book for years to come. If you’ve never read a book about or by Feynman, start with this one, and you’ll soon be coming back for more.

“The Meaning Of It All: Thoughts Of A Citizen Scientist” by Richard P. Feynman

Summary: five stars (5/5).

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